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Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Delights of New Mexico...

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Hello dear readers!

All summer, I've been meaning to give you a glimpse of my outings... but then I just kept getting busy with more outings.  So here's the first installment-- a smattering of pictures from my road trip with Ian to Taos while my parents stayed back in Fort Collins with Lil Dude and his cousin.

Here we are on the Rio Grande, at Manby (aka Stagecoach) hot springs.  We drove on some bumpy, dusty roads past funky earth-ship houses, parked the car, then hiked to the bottom of the canyon, where we were greeted by several natural pools of steamy water.  Ahhh....


Can you make out the ancient rock art with my name on it?


Interestingly, this wall was supposedly built as a set for the movie Easy Rider.  Now I want to go back and see that movie again...


Guess who took this picture?  Reefka Schneider-- part of a husband-wife poet-illustrator team whose books deal with Mexico border issues!  We randomly encountered Reefka and Steven in the hot springs, and found we had lots in common.  Serendipitous, no?


Desert flowers are so stunning... and then there's that refreshing scent of sage brush...


The area was actually relatively lush-- rain has been generous in the Southwest this year.


Next, we went to Ojo Caliente, more developed hot springs near Taos, but apparently we were sooooo relaxed we forgot to take pictures.

The next day we went to the Ghost Ranch, where artist Georgia O'Keefe sought creative refuge for many years.



Selfie with Ian...


We went on a Ghost Ranch history tour and heard weird stories of betrayal and buried treasure and a murdered brother and large flying babies covered in red hair that haunted the ranch...



Did a wee bit of labyrinth-walking, but dang, it was HOT!


My friend Helena saw this photo and wrote "TOTORO!"  (A wonderful Miyazaki film, Lil Dude's favorite, in which the giant magical-forest-creature flies with an umbrella.)


Here is one of my favorite quotes, which I discovered in a tiny, musty, mustard-colored book when I was a teen.  It's from Henry David Thoreau's journal:

"See what a life the gods have given us, set round with pain and pleasure. It is too strange for sorrow; it is too strange for joy.  One while it looks as shallow, though as intricate, as a Cretan labyrinth, and again it is a pathless depth."

My whole life, I've felt this way-- that life alternates between feeling like a labyrinth and a pathless depth.

On that note, I will bid you farewell, dear readers, so that I can go pick up Lil Dude from school.  Oh, and I can finally tell you my exciting new book news within the next few days! Hooray!

xo,
Laura

P.S.  And I have to tell you about this amazing restaurant Ian and I ate at twice for dinner in Taos!  It's called Loveapple, and is a sweet old adobe chapel converted into a farm-to-table restaurant.  Every entree is insanely delicious and garnished with edible flowers!


Chocolate cake...


Such a treat to have a luxuriously long, kid-less dinner... twice in one weekend!


And here's a random photo of Ian and me at our friend Les Sunde's magical art-place in Bellvue....  (and here's the article I wrote about his wonder-filled place a couple years ago, if you're curious.)



Thanks for swinging by!

xo,
Laura

4 comments:

  1. Went to both hot springs places you mentioned while in Taos last year. Good memories! Beautiful photos.

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  2. Such beautiful pictures! I was born in NM and have a lot of family still there--it's all very close to my heart! I'm glad you had a great kid-free trip!

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  3. Natasha, I love how we take such similar vacations... Costa Rica, Taos... what next? :-)

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  4. Jackee, how cool that you were born in NM! I really feel like it's a magical state... and I can get my "foreign-country" fix by going there, because it's just so different than anywhere else in the U.S. (in both landscape and culture.) And my research-assistantship in grad school in Anthropology involved translating colonial documents from the Spaniards interactions with the Hopi... so I have an intimate sense of the local history there. Lucky you for having family there!!

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